Ric drasin steroids

George Burkhardt   hes a lucky kid cause he can hear all the cool stories about the old golds gym days when u and the crew trained together and hung out, i am so impressed by rics stories that i find myself spending 7 to 8 hrs watching his videos somedays . i really enjoyed the video where he went to the olds golds and showed us where they used to hang out on the beach and also the grassy area where they sun tanned also, u can actually see the emotions in rics eyes as he goes down memory lane visiting these places, thats why i really love rics videos is cause he wears his heart on his sleeve and he keeps everything real and doesnt bullshit us. im so glad i found rics videos cause im the biggest 70,s/ arnold era fanatic around, i honestly dont think anyone loves that era more than me, best tim ever back then.

Drasin's interests in bodybuilding , powerlifting , weightlifting , and guitar playing began in junior high school. When Drasin was in high school, he formed a band known as The Epics, who were featured at YMCA Day at the Hollywood Bowl in 1960. [3] About three months later, The Epics competed in a Battle of the Bands contest at the Hollywood Palladium , placing second out of about 200 bands. One of the prizes was a one-year recording contract with Capitol Records . Capitol Records changed the name of The Epics to The Hollywood Vines, who recorded two cruising songs, "Cruisin’" and "When Johnny Comes Slidin’ Home." The 45 rpm record (Capitol Records reference number 4511) was released in 1961. Although the record was a success, the band drifted apart as the members grew into adulthood. [4] Drasin enlisted in the Army Reserves for eight years and was inducted on his 18th birthday. [3] On active duty for approximately six months after enlistment and for two weeks each year thereafter, Drasin served as a clerk/typist and driver, achieving the rank of Sergeant . He was stationed at Fort Ord , California, and Fort Lewis , Washington.

Gold had no patience for complainers; he made gladiators, not big-armed girls. The son of a Jewish junkman, he'd grown up in the working-class slums of ., and he had learned to fight his battles when the Polish toughs hassled him after school. In high school, he began hanging around the Muscle Beach Weight Pen , where the giants of the day posed for boardwalk crowds that grew to the tens of thousands on weekends. Gold got big there and formed lifelong friendships, and though he was gone for long chunks of the next two decades – to the South Pacific in World War II, where he was injured by a torpedo strike, and to South America with the Merchant Marines until he quit sailing in the early 1960s – his heart was firmly docked off Muscle Beach. When the authorities shut the Pen down in 1959, declaring it a magnet for "low morality" (read: big bodies, small swimsuits, horny tourists), Gold's friends scattered to dives like the Dungeon and a new, bare-bones weight pit on Venice Beach. Gold built his gym to bring those beasts home, and charged them the sweetheart rate of $40 a year. "If you didn't have the cash, though – and a lot of them didn't – Joe would let you slide," says Drasin. "Hell, at some point or another, he supported half those guys. Paid 'em to show up and do nothing."

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